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declaration of independence

What Is The Best Description Of The Structure Of The Declaration Of Independence?

When we look at the United States Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, which best describes the structure of the declaration of independence? If we were to use those two documents as a dictionary, we could come up with some interesting entries. The United States does not have "natural rights," it only has self-government in relation to other peoples and their rights. It did, however, declare itself an independent nation when it was joined to the British Empire.

which best describes the structure of the declaration of independence

 

The preamble section of the declaration of independence begins with "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, the press, and right of balloting for Electors of the Legislature, and of course the right to keep and bear arms." Those words are written down by James Madison, the father of the Constitution. Those are actually the very same words used by George Washington as he put together the Articles of Union.

 

The second paragraph of the preamble provides a summary of what those unalienable rights look like. It says that these rights are "inalienable" by quote. That means that they are not understood or meant to mean anything else by the government of the day. You cannot give people any rights that you don't believe they have by force. This would be against the fundamental nature of what it is to be a nation. It is not a country of laws but of rights.

 

This is the conclusion to the preamble section of the declaration of independence. It then goes on to further describe the nature of those rights. It specifically says that these rights are unalienable because no man can "make you a king, nor can anybody create a king in your image." These words were spoken by John Adams, one of the signatories of the declaration of independence. He said those words in his famous speech, "With liberty, happiness, and wealth, we can live better, more happy lives."

 

The other part of the essay is the thesis list of reasons why the British government is oppressive. The thesis list is divided into three parts. The first part talks about why the colonists did separate from England. The second part talks about why the British Crown was oppressive and wanted the colonists to leave. The last part of the thesis list explains why the colonies must separate if the British government was ever to be restored.

 

The preamble section of the declaration of independence describes the nature of unalienable rights. It explains that those rights are not derived from any law or constitution of the British Government. It is an "inalienable right." This means nothing can be taken from the colonists without their consent. It does not have to pass a strict Constitutional test, but the Supreme Court has stated that the preamble is a sufficient requirement for a document to meet the Constitutional requirement of the "complete structure" of a nation-state.

 

The thesis list of reasons why the British government is oppressive also includes an explanation of the lack of freedom in the country. The preamble states that all men are "free and equal." However, it then goes on to list a series of oppressions the colonists had experienced at the hands of the British. One example is the six years imprisonment suffered by Native Americans during the Colonial period. This article goes into more detail about this topic in the historical literature.

 

The third part of the thesis list of reasons why the British government is oppressive includes information about the treatment the colonists received. It details how they were treated while traveling to other parts of the world. Also, the documentation of their trials are documented as well. Part four of the thesis discusses information regarding the Articles of Independence. This article describes the Articles of Independence and outlines the reasons why the colonists decided to put these documents together and form a declaration.